Monthly Archives

June 2021

Patient dismisses doctor, nurse practitioner in suit alleging chemical burns

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A doctor and a nurse practitioner have been dismissed from a patient’s lawsuit alleging she suffered chemical burns when trichloroacetic acid was used on her arm instead of rubbing alcohol. Plaintiff Emily Schulte filed a motion to voluntarily dismiss defendants Dennis Hurford, M.D., and Kelly Murray, NP, with prejudice and each party bearing their own costs. Her claims against Gateway…

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Six Flags Park Settling Illinois Park Fingerprints Lawsuit for $36M

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Six Flags Great America has settled a class-action lawsuit by agreeing to pay $36 million over the use of fingerprint scanners at its Illinois theme park. Pass holders and others who visited the Gurnee park between October 2013 and Dec. 31, 2018 could get up to $200 each, the Chicago Tribune reported. Texas-based Six Flags declined to comment. Six Flags…

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New legislation aims to allow patients to sue health insurance companies

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If you want to sue your health insurance company in federal court because they denied your claim or they’re not paying your medical bills in a timely fashion, chances are you can’t. But some Democrats want to change that. Many of the major health insurance companies have what are called mandatory arbitration clauses in their contracts, which require patients to…

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Split COA rules for Michigan City on injured cyclist’s negligence claim

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A split Indiana Court of Appeals panel has affirmed judgment for Michigan City after a cyclist was injured on a city street, finding the city was immune from the cyclist’s negligence claim. A dissenting judge, however, would have reversed on the issue of immunity. In the spring of 2017, Michigan City officials determined Duneland Beach Drive needed to be resurfaced,…

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Judge Rules in Utility’s Favor in Suit over Deadly Indiana Explosion

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A judge has ruled in favor of a utility in a lawsuit filed over a 2017 natural gas explosion in southwestern Indiana that killed two women and injured three other people. A Vanderburgh County judge granted CenterPoint’s motion for summary judgment on June 8 in the civil lawsuit. The judge found that the plaintiffs failed to produce evidence the utility…

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Indiana Cop Was Speeding Before Hitting, Killing Pregnant Woman: Lawsuit

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An Indianapolis police officer was speeding and made an illegal lane change just before his patrol car struck and killed a pregnant woman last year near a highway ramp, the woman’s boyfriend alleges in a federal lawsuit. Attorneys for Marcus Lewis Jr. allege that Officer Jonathan Henderson was driving 33 mph over the speed limit moments before he hit 23-year-old…

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Suit alleges driver ran red light, fled scene after causing crash

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A driver allegedly ran a red light iin St. Louis and then fled the scene of an accident that left another driver with a traumatic brain injury. Cathleen L. Vano and Angela Brickman, co-guardians of the Estate of Steven A. Vano, a disabled adult, filed a complaint May 24 in the Madison County Circuit Court against Eliana Augusta Rose Wilds,…

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Tenant alleges injuries after allegedly falling through mobile home floor

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A renter who allegedly fell through the floor in his mobile home claims his landlord ignored numerous requests to repair the floor. Thomas Ackerman filed a complaint May 25 in the Madison County Circuit Court against Mohammed Jalali, doing business as Lake Shore Estates alleging negligence. Ackerman, who was a tenant at the defendant’s mobile home park in Granite City,…

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Perspectives: Tips for rebutting COVID-19 presumption

By | Workers' Compensation | No Comments

Numerous states have enacted COVID-19 presumptions for first responders and essential workers, while many others are considering enacting similar legislation. These presumptions allow employees who contract COVID-19 to meet their burden that the contraction arose out of and in the course of employment. Several states, including Minnesota, New Jersey, California and Alaska, have enacted COVID-19 presumption statutes but have not…

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